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In the Limelight Blog

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You’ve may have heard of some or all of these live streaming apps including Periscope, Meerkat, Facebook Live, Muvi Studio, NomadCast and  Sywork. Maybe you are already using one these. There’s no doubt they are popular – Periscope gained a million users in the first ten days after its iPhone launch, and many more after its release on Android. Twitter acquired Periscope, and now users can tweet links to live-streams. All these apps are not the same, so let’s take a look at what they do and how they differ from each other:

 

  • Meerkat – Available for iOS and Android, broadcasts to followers. Videos are deleted immediately after broadcast.
  • Periscope – Available for iOS and Android, broadcasts to followers. Videos live for 24 hours before deletion, though you can save them to your camera roll.
  • Facebook Live – This app got off to a controversial start - at the moment it’s for celebrities only – yes, that’s right! It broadcasts to a celebrity’s followers with watch comments overlaid on the stream. The streams reach viewers while in progress and pushes alerts to subscribers who’ve recently interacted with the page. Videos are not deleted.
  • Muvi Studio – Clever name, huh? Muvi is a 3rd party provider for corporate clients and broadcasters by offering a cloud infrastructure for Live and On-demand services. Available for desktop, mobile apps, connected TV, and soon for the Roku player.
  • NomadCast  - Known as “Facebook live streaming for commoners” streams directly on Facebook and Twitter, providing playable video on Facebook walls and in Twitter feeds.
  • Sywork – This is a live streaming platform for illustrators and digital artists, allowing them to show off their work. Viewers can watch live illustrations.

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So, who has been using these apps? They have attracted the attention of media and broadcasting companies as they offer a very low cost way to reach new audiences. CNN used Periscope during their coverage of the birth of Princess Charlotte, with a reporter touring London on the top deck of a bus, interviewing riders, and showing the sites. In the political arena, David Cameron used Periscope to broadcast his first post-election address from number 10. Musicians have also been using them. The Rolling Stones used Periscope to broadcast their “secret” show in Los Angeles in May this year. Local bands use them to broadcast to their followers.

 

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What has become controversial is the use of these apps at live sports events. Sponsors of events fear losing live TV audience to viewing broadcasts from attendees at events. One of the most well-known instances of this was during a big pay-per-view boxing match, where ring side attendees broadcast the match. Responses from the various sports leagues have been mixed to date. Wimbledon banned audience members from broadcasting matches, as has the PGA and NHL, but not the NFL.

 

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In the view of many observers, these mobile device broadcasts shouldn’t be considered a threat to the mainstream professional broadcasts from TV networks. Would someone really watch an entire sporting event broadcast from a hand held phone, with jerky motion and accompanying background noise?

What is likely to happen is the networks will realize an opportunity here. Think of all the potential phone broadcasts at an NFL game from audience around a stadium. Those could be incorporated into the network’s broadcasts – picking the best clips from the live audience perspective. This would enhance what the home viewer sees, delivering a “just like they were there” experience.

What does the future hold? It’s so early in the technology cycle, with the expected evolution of these apps in terms of quality and functionality that it’s too difficult to predict. It is safe to assume a significant impact, and as broadcasters experiment with incorporating audience broadcast content, the viewing experience overall will improve.

 

No matter what the future holds, Limelight will ready to deliver your video at broadcast quality to a global audience. Limelight Networks combines the power and reach of one of the world’s largest private content delivery networks (CDN) with a purpose-built intelligent platform to deliver your video reliably and at broadcast quality, anywhere in the world. Learn more about our solutions for video delivery and Media and Broadcasters on the Limelight website, or reach me directly at ckraus@llnw.com .

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Recently four gaming industry leaders gathered in San Francisco to talk about a major trend in gaming: gamers producing and watching each other’s game videos, and the impact it’s having on their business strategies.  The panel was hosted by Newzoo CEO, Peter Warman, and inspired by Newzoo’s whitepaper:  Consumer as Producer: How Games and Video Converge to Drive Growth  sponsored by Limelight Networks.

 

Watching the 54 minute panel which featured a lively discussion, I gleaned some possible answers to challenges we posed in the initial Consumer as Producer blog.

 

1) How do you get the cooperation of creative consumers in building your game brand?

2) How do you share and protect your IP at the same time?

3) What is the role of the emerging “game audience” - viewers who love game videos and aren’t necessarily playing or buying the game?

 

The panelists included a game developer COO, an Esports team CEO,  the COO of Twitch, and CEO of Game Theorists, a video subscription channel on Youtube with over 5 million subscribers.

 

COO Kristian Segerstrale describes SuperEvil MegaCorp as a game developer, that embraces all three challenges. Videos and viewership are so important that it tracks total viewers on Twitch and Youtube as a company metric.  (The number has grown from .5M to 1.5M in less than a year).  The company actively promotes player stars on Youtube, and just embarked on its first Esports tournament for VainGlory, not worrying about the fact the prize is only $30K.  Even more revolutionary - the reality of video watching is helping to drive the design of their game.  The company wants ipad-playable VainGlory to be understandable for casual viewers after just a few minutes of watching, like basketball.  On the IP front, what happens when avid fans “borrow” game art to create a cool t-shirt or video?  You might think a team of lawyers would be dispatched, but instead engineers don them proudly and share pictures wearing them. 

 

Wouter Sleijffers is CEO of Fnatic, one of the world’s top professional gaming teams notes that video is a major means of communicating with their fans, and building the team brand.  In fact, the team encourages the fans to create and build out the brand by making their own videos. Sleijffers  commented “there is an amazing amount of demand out there for game play footage”.

 

So who’s watching all this besides avid game players?

 

Both Game Theorist, a subscription-based Youtube video company owned by Matthew Patrick, and Twitch, represented by co-founder Kevin Lin, weighed in about the reality of the “game viewing” audience which now lurks just beyond the realm of marketers, watching but not buying games.  Patrick says it’s real, and points out some games have had viewing audiences that are 3-4 times larger than their player base. Matthew’s company, Game Theorist, now has 5 million followers and 113 videos on itsYoutube channel.   He explains video is helping enable the development of lifestyle brands built on game environments and characters.  Building a brand around a game used to take 30 years - now it takes a matter of months. For Twitch also, watchers are now seen as part of the game, not just the players.

 

The existence of a larger game viewing audience opens up all kinds of growth opportunities for the industry.  It could lead to a range of monetization strategies employed by other forms of entertainment, from syndicated content to merchandise.  But profiting from it it will depend on how willing the game industry is to nurture this whole new one-to-many relationship, and perhaps, create new content just for this audience.

 

So listening to these industry leaders, I’m going to offer some possible answers:

1) How do you get the cooperation of creative consumers in building your game brand? Possible answer: treat them fairly and the rest will sort itself out.

2) How do you share and protect your IP at the same time? Possible answer: you don’t always do both.

3) What is the role of the emerging “game audience” - viewers who love game videos and aren’t necessarily playing or buying the game?  Possible answer:  first you have to recognize its there and decide what you want to create for it.  And you might consider making your game easy to understand for casual viewers a part of your strategy.

 

What do you think? Are you an industry watcher or game publisher looking at how to incorporate the gamer video phenomenon into your strategy?  We’d love to hear from you here at Limelight.  Meanwhile, to all you gamers out there, we hope you capture your next epic moment in video and

 

Stream On!

 

To watch the whole discussion, check out Casual Connect’s channel on Youtube.

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Last year, Amazon put a stake in the ground with its purchase of Twitch for $970 million. This put an eye-popping value on gamer video sharing, and highlighted a trend that many dedicated gaming fans already knew: video creation and sharing is an increasingly important part of how gamers enjoy their game.

 

A year later, two more stakes have been placed in the ground. In this blog we talk about one of them - the trend of consumers producing their own gaming videos.  This trend is examined in great detail in a recently released report from Newzoo, The Consumer as Producer: How Games and Video Converge to Drive Growth, which was sponsored by Limelight Networks. Newzoo projects revenues of $113 billion for the gaming market by 2018.  Will this number grow even bigger as a function of gamer videos? That’s not clear yet, but industry players are starting to figure out how to get in on the action.

 

The whitepaper leaves no doubt that the phenomenon is big. Here are some examples from the data: Minecraft-based videos alone garnered 4.1 Billion (yes, billion) views in one month while League of Legends fans watched 81 million hours of game play videos on Twitch in May alone.

 

What’s also discussed is that multiple monetization strategies are in play.  With Twitch and YouTube providing free sharing services for gamers, game publishers; new platform providers such as Azubu and Kamcord are looking for creative ways to create revenue streams.  Esports events are particularly attractive given their ability to concentrate talent, money and time, while also controlling access to content. They offer a clearer path to monetization than many other strategies which is why the paper devotes a whole page to the topic of Esports and video.

 

Like a lot of cool things in gaming, this trend started with gamers themselves, and they are still at the heart of the action.  Limelight’s own research showed 22% of gamers post videos of themselves and 36% watch a second screen, usually featuring other gamers playing, while they game.   See: Consumer Gaming Trends, 2014

 

Players are learning how to become personalities, opinion leaders and franchises unto themselves. As the co-founder of Twitch pointed out during a panel discussion on the whitepaper (see my blog on industry reaction to the paper) “We’re helping gamers become entertainers”.

 

From a business strategy perspective, the most important things this trend tees up for the gaming industry are:

 

1) Brand efforts to benefit from all this creativity will have to be undertaken with the cooperation of the consumer.  What are the best practices for building this cooperation, and what are the technology requirements behind those practices?

 

2) What new approaches to owning, licensing, and sharing game creative content will provide the most productive relationships with consumers?  How can technology help game content creators protect and share their creativity at the same time?

 

3) What is the nature of the now discovered “game audience” - a growing set of viewers who don’t play or buy a game, but nevertheless enjoy game videos. And what role will this group play in the monetization of this trend?

 

Read our second blog on this topic to explore these questions further, and see industry reaction to the whitepaper.    Meanwhile, what’s the 2nd stake in the ground? Last week, Youtube went live with Youtube Gaming - a new dedicated platform for sharing all videos gaming. How the new platform really differs from its predecessor remains to be explored, but it is a direct assault on the enviable position Twitch has carved out for itself.

 

So consumers are becoming producers, and as a leader in providing video streaming services, Limelight is proud to be an enabler of this trend - with flexible and scalable solutions to help our gaming customers address this development right here, right now.

 

For a free download of the Newzoo whitepaper just click here:

Consumer as Producer: How Games and Video Converge to Drive Growth

 

Stream On!

Today we announced that eDreams Odigeo, the world’s largest online travel company in the flight sector and the largest publicly traded European e-commerce company, has selected the Limelight OrchestrateTM Delivery service to deliver its e-commerce web sites. eDreams, based in Barcelona, Spain has more than 16 million customers across 44 countries and more than 325 million views on their website per month.

 

To completely globalize their services, they needed a global content delivery provider that could deliver content to any device, especially tablets and phones.

“Our customers are well educated, savvy users of online travel agencies and don’t want to spend more than 15 minutes booking their travel. We reached a point where we needed to diversify our platform and give our users an improved experience when booking their travel. We chose Limelight’s CDN so we could give our users around the globe an exceptional experience. Limelight had the best performance in our tests, as well as the best support.” - Aranzazu Del Rio, procurement manager at eDreams Odigeo.

 

A copy of the press release is posted to our website, and can be found here.

Limelight has been nominated in The 2015 Streaming Media Reader’s Choice Awards!  There are three categories we are in the running for: Best Content Delivery Network, Live Video Platform and Media & Entertainment Video Platform!  We would be honored to have your vote.  To learn more and vote click here.

 

Note: Limelight Employees can't vote, however they can spread the word.

We are thrilled to tell you Limelight's Orchestrate for Media & Broadcasters has been selected as a Stevie® Awards People's Choice Award finalist! 

 

The Stevie Awards are the world's premier business awards and were created to honor and generate public recognition of the achievements and positive contributions of organizations and working professionals worldwide. 

 

Here's where you can help.  Please cast your vote and spread the word to customers, family or friends.  Every vote counts. 

 

Click here for the voting website and then click on the Content-Other Solutions category and select the Limelight solution. [Screen shots are below.]

 

Voting closes at midnight ET this Friday, August 7th.

 

Thank you for supporting Limelight and helping us beat out the competition!

 

Screen Shots:

  1. Link to voting: https://peopleschoice.stevieawards.com/default.cfm?sitetype=P
  2. Select ‘Content: Other Solutions’

 

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In this third and final blog in this series exploring challenges and solutions to developing and distributing software releases and device updates, we will look at the Delivery phase.

 

OK, your Beta program was a success, the team received the feedback they needed to get the new software just right and wrap up development. Now it’s time to plan broad end user distribution. Expectations for a great download experience on the part of the end users will be high.  It is common for a large percentage of users to download new software on the day it first becomes available. A poor download experience on their part can have a devastating effect on your brand. Just as with the Beta code distribution, the website users will interact with to download released software should be considered as part of the marketing toolkit. If it’s a device update you are delivering, you will want an option of toll-free delivery to users so they don’t take a hit on their data plan.  Are you confident you have a process, infrastructure, and workflow capable of delivering consistent, reliable, and secure downloads at global scale? Consider:

 

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How can you avoid frustration with your users downloads? Put your marketing in top gear, starting with the download experience. Leverage Limelight’s smart edge detection, giving you user geo-location and device type enabling delivery of the correct file to each user. Here is your chance to enhance brand integrity with the best possible download experience. Here’s what the cloud infrastructure looks like to provide these benefits:

 

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Limelight’s Software and Device Manufacturers Solution solves the Delivery phase challenges, combining the power and reach of one of the world’s largest private content delivery networks (CDN) with a purpose-built intelligent platform to deliver your digital files reliably and securely anywhere in the world. Learn more about Limelight’s Orchestrate for Software and Device Manufacturers Solution Here on the Limelight website. Read a great White Paper on user expectations for downloading software and how to meet their requirements. If you are curious about what users across generations think today about their download experiences and what devices they use, check out this new Survey. Or see what a leading security software developer does to deliver awesome download experiences to their customers in this Case Study.

If you distribute content at significant scale, you probably count on a content delivery network (CDN) service provider to ensure that your content is always available.

 

But what happens when you need to do the reverse—to remove your content from a user's access path, just as fast as you delivered it? What happens when hundreds of copies of your file are cached across multiple geo locations, and you need to purge them all immediately?

 

Consider these scenarios:

 

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(1) An e-commerce company mistakenly posts the wrong image for a low-cost item in its online inventory, displaying the image of a $1,200 product with a $90 price tag.

 

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(2) A global software company discovers a glitch during beta testing, which could cause security issues and provoke customer anger and mistrust. The testing team must react quickly to prevent users from downloading the incorrect version.

 

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(3) The top article on a popular news site contains a reporting error, causing readers to act on false information about a major economic issue and potentially affecting the stock market.

 

 

These are extreme examples, but surprisingly common. Consider Amazon's mistaken $0.01 sale of the $599 LG G4 smartphone, the case of the missing Apple Music files, and the New York Times' premature publication of two conflicting articles about a U.S. Senate vote.

 

CDNs receive regular requests from customers that need to purge content from cache right now. Although their situations are urgent, customers are often left tapping their fingers while content is manually deleted from a centralized queue. Requests can become backlogged and purges can take hours to execute.

 

A less dramatic example is an organization that regularly replaces or deletes files like scripts and style sheets. In these cases, the consequences of serving stale content may not be as dire. However, purging can still cost your business in the form of process inefficiency.

 

Even with self-service options, submitting a single command can require a clunky, multi-step workflow that is not repeatable. And verifying that content was actually purged, especially from multiple servers, is a resource drain that consumes valuable cycles and leaves you guessing.

 

The Internet is a globally interconnected superhighway, where information moves fast and business have to move even faster. SmartPurge from Limelight allows you to shortcut the problems normally associated with purge, deleting content permanently from the network edge in a matter of seconds and removing guesswork from the process.

 

Check out this short video demo from CDN expert Steve Miller-Jones to see how it works.

 

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On July 25th, in preparing for major upcoming customer events, Limelight was removing older technology from its infrastructure when an error was encountered. This resulted in degraded delivery performance for a subset of Limelight customers starting at 1:15 am MST. The root cause of this particular issue was definitively identified, isolated, and resolved with service being restored to most customers within 45 min and full service being restored within 2 hours. Customer satisfaction is Limelight Network’s highest priority. Limelight is committed to continuous improvement of its support systems and processes with a goal of eliminating service disruption.

If you have ever downloaded anything from the Internet – be it a mobile app, a software patch, or an application – there is a high likelihood you had a frustrating experience at some point.

 

That’s because most companies providing updates or software files only think in the context of the download speed of the file being delivered. They confine their performance and reliability measurements just to the file being downloaded, but fail to see the big picture.

 

While file download speed, reliability, and availability have a major impact on your end-user satisfaction measurement, they do not constitute of the whole download experience.

 

In our recent State of Digital Downloads survey, we found out that almost 30% of users blamed the brand (your company!) in the case of a frustrating download experience. In fact, 40% of users switched context or abandoned a webpage within 5 seconds of delay.

 

Believe it or not, your end users may be getting impacted by a slow download portal. Your Beta software version that was supposed to drive early adoption and pave the way for future product success? It’s entangled in the mess of a slow download portal.

 

Download the report

 

This said, it is a very addressable situation.

 

Software download portals should not be perceived as an afterthought. Everything that goes on in that portal – the download manager, product usage videos, security – are all part of the end user’s experience. For example, if your download portal requires a login page (or in other words is gated), how slow is the login page?

 

Using dynamic web acceleration technologies like Limelight Orchestrate Performance, you can drastically improve the time it takes for end users to log in and access the files they need. As a part of our latest solution to address these challenges for Software and Device Manufacturers, we not only accelerate the download portal, but also make sure your training videos are accessible for all devices, and the geo-restrictions are in place according to policies you set. It is the most advanced end-to-end software delivery and device update solution.

 

Every day, Limelight helps companies use our intelligent technology to solve their global business challenges. We would love to hear from you and continue the conversation on Limelight Connect.

 

Keep the conversation going on Twitter with @LLNW and @_AllThingsMe.

In this second blog in a three part series exploring challenges and solutions to developing and distributing software releases and device updates, we will look at the Beta phase. A follow-on blog will cover final release delivery.

 

It’s time for Beta testing. Now it starts to get exciting – all the development teams’ hard work, late nights and weekends getting the new code ready for testing by your users or potential users has brought you to the final stages of development. You have pre-qualified Beta users excited to test your software. You want to make a great first impression by delivering the best possible software download experience.  How are you going to do this globally and manage the download of regional code versions? Can your website handle downloads securely and be responsive to user testing feedback?    

                            

One of the challenges you have to contend with is the growing number of devices and frequency of updates. Consider the very fragmented Android installed base, or virus definition updates to devices running various operating systems. The below infographic clearly shows that fragmentation is getting worse over time:

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The challenge here is the number of different update files specific to each type of device and OS that have to be delivered to the correct device. This is where you leverage Limelight’s smart edge detection, giving you user geo-location and device type enabling delivery of the correct file to each user. Here is your chance to enhance brand integrity with the best possible download experience. Here’s what the cloud infrastructure looks like to provide these benefits:

 

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Limelight’s Software and Device Manufacturers Solution solves the Beta phase challenges, combining the power and reach of one of the world’s largest private content delivery networks (CDN) with a purpose-built intelligent platform to deliver your digital files reliably and securely anywhere in the world. Learn more about Limelight’s Orchestrate for Software and Device Manufacturers Solution Here on the Limelight website. Read a great White Paper on user expectations for downloading software and how to meet their requirements. If you are curious about what users across generations think today about their download experiences and what devices they use, check out this new Survey. Or see what a leading security software developer does to deliver awesome download experiences to their customers in this Case Study.

 

Next week I will blog about the challenges of the Delivery and Update phase of distributing the final software release or device update.

In this video demo, Limelight Product Manager Steve Miller-Jones demonstrates how to purge content from the Limelight content delivery network (CDN) in a matter of seconds. Orchestrate Delivery customers can access an intuitive interface via the Control management portal, and remove content from user access with a real-time effect using SmartPurge.

 

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Today, we launched RAMP (Recognition, Awards, and Motivation Program) on Limelight Connect to provide community members with a fun way to view interesting and helpful content and contribute to the community--while earning points and recognition. If you participate in other communities or forums, you are probably already familiar with earning points and gaining recognition for your contributions.

 

If you aren’t familiar, you’ll find that RAMP is fun, easy, and rewarding. Start small by adding an avatar to your profile or liking someone’s post. Earn more points each time you add valuable contributions, such as asking or answering questions, creating blog posts, and providing ongoing contributions to the community.

 

What are Missions?

Missions are specific actions that we encourage you to take in the community. By successfully completing a mission, you earn points. Missions can be simple, such as liking someone else’s post, or more difficult, such as performing a series of tasks to earn big points. The more valuable your contributions, the more points you earn for the mission.

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What are Badges?

Badges are images that are awarded to you when you successfully complete a mission. It’s fun to earn and collect the badges as you continue to contribute to the community. You can even display earned badges on your own profile.

 

What are Levels?

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Levels are earned by completing missions and accruing points. The more missions you complete, the more points you accumulate, and the higher your ranking within the community.

 

Discover which contributions are more valuable and how many points you'll need to earn to get to the next level! You'll find it's easy to engage in the community and move from Level 1 (Byte) to Level 2 (Kilobyte), but what will it take to get to Level 6 (Terabyte) or Level 9 (Yottabyte)? You'll have to find out by continually engaging with us and offering contributions.

 

 

 

 

 

How Do I Get Started?

Log in to see whether you've completed a mission and earned points and badges. After logging in, view your own profile and look at your profile details. Scroll down to see your activity. Take a look at the missions to see how many you've achieved and how close you are to achieving others. Take a look at Rankings to see how you compare to other community members. Then get going and start interacting with your peers in the community!

 

Not yet a member? Register right here.

 

We hope you enjoy this new feature on Limelight Connect, and as always, we welcome your feedback. Feel free to comment on this post or send me an email at eforan@llnw.com.

 

 

Thanks,

 

Eileen

RedVector, an industry-leading online training provider, actively sought a way to improve efficiencies in hosting and delivering its mobile video training courses to students.

 

To get started, RedVector partnered with Limelight and began using the Limelight Content Delivery Network (CDN) to host and deliver mobile training content. Limelight has turbocharged how we distribute online video to media devices everywhere. Its intuitive interface lets us load up video and have it automatically converted to the formats we need.

 

As online organizations like RedVector can attest, it’s become increasingly harder to master a multiformat, multichannel, multidevice universe. Limelight methods allowed RedVector training videos to be served up in a single format compatible with all browsers and devices, and made course videos “lighter,” freeing up significant space. RedVector was also able to view reports on usage that were not available before.

 

This summer, RedVector began using the Limelight video platform with impressive results. The new video player transcodes on the fly based on the learner's browser/device. RedVector simply uploads a single MP4 video, and the player does the rest. It also has an adaptive bitrate feature, which means that the learner's bandwidth determines the quality of the video presented. If the bandwidth is low, then a slightly lower quality video is displayed for a second or two. As the bandwidth catches up, the higher quality video plays, without skipping a beat.

 

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Using Limelight, RedVector has also been able to include captions in the bottom of its video content. This also gives some flexibility in incorporating captions in different languages. Finally, RedVector is utilizing Limelight’s video analytics to manage and monitor usage and other metrics.

In this first blog in a three part series exploring challenges and solutions to developing and distributing software releases and device updates, we will look at the development phase. Two follow-on blogs will cover Beta and final release delivery.

 

Imagine you are the product manager for a hot new software release, or the coolest new connected device getting an important code update. Like most organizations, your development team may be dispersed across multiple locations globally. To manage development files, you may use a software developer’s file versioning management tool, and have a secured central software file repository that is shared.

                                

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Some of the challenges you face in this environment include slow file upload/download (depending on the network infrastructure connecting the remote locations), ensuring security of the file transfers, and replication of files in multiple locations to guarantee their availability in the case of unplanned events. One thing you can count on is software files are growing in size from release to release and as development progresses. As an example – look at the size increase in AppleTM IOS software from release 7.0 to release 8.0 –> 43%:

 

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These challenges bring with them something else – a manual workflow to handle all the tasks. Happily, there are solutions to these challenges. Take advantage of cloud storage and infrastructure for global scale to reach all your remote locations. Cloud storage integrated with a CDN will provide multiple file ingest methods and locations. You can have policy-based file replication, positioning files near developers in remote locations. As the size and number of files increases, you will be able to scale on demand. Here’s what the cloud infrastructure would look like to provide these benefits:

 

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Limelight’s Software and Device Manufacturers Solution solves the development phase challenges, combining the power and reach of one of the world’s largest private content delivery networks (CDN) with a purpose-built intelligent platform to deliver your digital files reliably and securely anywhere in the world. Learn more about Limelight’s Orchestrate for Software and Device Manufacturers Solution Here on the Limelight website. Read a great White Paper on user expectations for downloading software and how to meet their requirements. If you are curious about what users across generations think today about their download experiences and what devices they use, check out this new Survey. Or see what a leading security software developer does to deliver awesome download experiences to their customers in this Case Study.

 

Next week I will blog about the Beta phase of development and the challenges and solutions to having a successful Beta program.