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2016

Hello Limelight Connect members.

 

Q: If I have an mp4 file in the origin with multiple language audio, will HLS and DASH from MMD OD automatically  generate multi audio in the output manifests?


A: Yes. MMD OD is a simple, yet powerful, engine to deliver chunked streaming output from your media files. One of the many features of MMD OD is the ability to support the transmuxing of multiple language audio tracks to HLS and DASH outputs. Following industry specifications, you will find the language tracks listed within the HLS manifest files and the DASH Media Presentation Description (MPD) files, ready for your player to access .

 

Have a question or comment? Add to the conversation by commenting below or emailing me at kweinberger@llnw.com.


Keith Weinberger, Limelight’s Director of Product Management, Video, manages the features and roadmap for live streaming video transcoding, video on demand and online video platform products: MMD Live, MMD OD, Video Player and OVP.

Hello Limelight Connect members.

 

Q: I just decided to stop publishing videos through LVP. How long do I have to retrieve my files? 

 

A: We're never happy to see a Customer go, but we realize sometimes it happens. In these cases, we want to ensure that the great experience you had while using our services continues through your transition to your next adventure. For that reason, we give you a generous grace period of ninety days after you leave us in which we will preserve your media. If you have a change of heart and just can't live without Limelight in your life, come back within ninety days and your account will be reactivated and all your media will be just as your left it. We'll take you back - no questions asked. 


Have a question or comment? Add to the conversation by commenting below or emailing me at kweinberger@llnw.com.

 

Keith Weinberger, Limelight’s Director of Product Management, Video, manages the features and roadmap for live streaming video transcoding, video on demand and online video platform products: MMD Live, MMD OD, Video Player and OVP.

At Limelight, we pride ourselves on ensuring that our customers have a positive experience with Limelight. We’ve asked for your feedback and have listened to it and acted upon it to help make our products and services the best in the industry.

 

We want to thank all of you who participated in our Limelight 2016 Voice of the Customer survey. We had a great response, and you provided extremely valuable input on all areas of our business. 

 

Here are just a few of the features and innovations we’ve delivered this year that have incorporated feedback from our customers:

  • Release of the award-winning SmartPurge, Limelight’s fast and intelligent purge tool
  • Self-service options with added configuration capabilities in Control 3
  • Live & VOD video packaging services over HTTP & HTTPS with custom bitrates
  • PoP expansion and increased capacity in more regions and countries

 

 

We appreciate your enthusiasm and remain committed to continuing to use your feedback as we select our new features and innovations in 2017.

 

For more information about the improvements we’re making and how they affect you, please talk with your Account Manager. And as always, please feel free to engage with us here on Limelight Connect.

I recently had the opportunity to participate in the data analysis for Limelight’s December 2016 "State of Online Video" market research.  The trends are undeniable.  Watching video online is no longer the future – it’s here today.  Why stay home to watch your favorite TV show when some broadcaster decided you should be watching it, when you can watch what you want, whenever you want, wherever you happen to be?  Consumers have taken control, and that has the traditional broadcasters and content distributors scared. 

 

How did this all happen?

 

I have been involved in the world of broadcast television for quite a while.  I began my professional career 30 years ago as a television Broadcast Engineering Operations Technician for a local television station in the US.  My job was to help get programs on the air so people at home could watch them.  Sometimes it was live programming, but most of the time it was pre-recorded shows.  When news broke, people tuned in at 6pm to learn more about the day’s big story.  Occasionally, we would even interrupt regularly scheduled programming for a Special Report.  However, the station controlled what you could watch and when you could watch it.  Viewers understood that was the way the world worked.

 

In the early 1990’s, computers and digital technology came along and changed the way video content was created.  It soon became feasible to convert analog video into digital files that could be stored on a computer disk for non-linear editing.  I was fortunate to be in the right place at the right time and joined a company that helped lead the digital video production revolution.  Over the next 20 years, I worked to bring about the demise of film and video tape in the video production process as everything became digital.  However, the distribution of this digitally produced content was fundamentally the same.  There were more cable TV channels broadcasting content, but the stations controlled what you could watch and when you could watch it.  Viewers understood that was the way the world worked.

 

Then, things started to change.  It started slowly and almost imperceptibly.  Broadband speeds to homes increased.  People started recording their cats doing funny things and posting them online for other people to view.  Viewers wanted updated information about breaking news events and didn’t want to wait until the evening newscast.  The Internet became a legitimate place viewers could go to watch video, even if the experience was often frustrating and the content was limited.

 

At first, the traditional Broadcasters and content distributors were concerned.  Would they lose viewers as people spent time watching user generated content on YouTube?  They soon convinced themselves that Internet video was not a threat to their traditional business model.  People would continue to turn to them because they had the best content.  They were half right.

 

As more diverse content became available online, younger viewers began to search out videos aligned with their interests, even if the production quality was poor and the video would stutter and re-buffer several times each minute.  Millennials controlled what they would watch and when they would watch it.  That was the way their world worked.

 

The Internet quickly became a viable way for content distributors to make videos available to viewers.  At first, the content was limited.  NetFlix took the pay TV movie channel business model and moved it to the Web.  Viewers could watch movies according to their schedule online.  Other companies followed.  Soon, compelling original content also became available online.  Now, everyone realized the benefits of watching what they want, when they want, on any device they want, at home or on the go.  It was a brave new world.

I spent the last decade working with the world’s largest broadcasters and content distributors on ways to streamline their content production and distribution processes.  Some foresaw this fundamental shift in viewing several years ago.  Others were in denial until very recently.  However, they all now realize consumers have taken control of the viewing experience, and audiences are more fragmented.  Their old business model of forcing you to watch what they broadcast when they broadcast it has completely imploded.

 

 

 

The results of Limelight’s December 2016 “State of Online Video” market research report confirms online video viewing has gone mainstream.  More than three-quarters of the people surveyed watch video online each week.  More than half of those people are watching more than two hours each week.  Among Millennials, the numbers are significantly higher.

 

People are going online to watch many different types of content.  While the majority reported watching TV-shows, those over 60 reported primarily watching original content from sources such as YouTube as well as news.  Millennials primarily watch TV-shows and movies.  More than 68 percent of respondents subscribe to a video on demand service.  We’ve come a long way from cat videos. 

 

While the majority of people use their computer to watch online videos, smartphones are increasingly being used as people want the flexibility to watch content on the go.  For Millennials, the smartphone is already the preferred device for online viewing.  Streaming devices such as Roku and Apple TV are also gaining in popularity as people want a high-quality in-home online video viewing experience on a large monitor, similar to what they get when watching traditional broadcast TV. 

 

What I found most interesting from the survey results is how expectations of the quality of the online viewing experience has grown to a point nearly matching expectations from broadcast television.  In the early days of online viewing, consumers learned to accept the fact that picture quality wouldn’t be as good as traditional broadcast television and the video would often stutter or re-buffer.  The new survey results show that 48 percent of people will stop watching a video if it re-buffers twice, and 78 percent will stop watching if it re-buffers three times.  Viewer expectations have certainly increased!

 

Half of online video viewers reported also subscribing to traditional cable or satellite TV.  Cost is the primary reason people are considering cutting the cord, although 24 percent said they are waiting for the ability to subscribe to just the channels they want online.  This may be a good sign for companies such as Sling TV and DirecTV Now that are offering “skinny bundles” that allow viewers more flexibility in choosing the channels they want at a lower cost.  However, content is still king, with 20 percent of Millennial males saying they won’t cut the cord until more live sports become available online.

 

What does this all mean?  Consumers have clearly taken control of the video viewing experience.  They want to choose what to watch and when to watch it.  They will pay to access the content they want online, but they expect it to be delivered flawlessly on any device.  Content distributors need to ensure the quality of the viewing experience in order to satisfy consumer demand and maximize revenue.  The good news is the technology needed to ensure such a high-quality online viewing experience is readily available from Limelight.

 

The content distribution process has undergone fundamental changes over the last few years as consumers have taken control.  The traditional broadcast television business model is imploding.  I’m excited to be part of the Limelight team that is helping content distributors thrive in this brave new world.

Hello Limelight Connect members.

 

Q: Will the GOP size of the RTMP ingest stream be changed by MMD Live?

 

A: No. MMD Live will preserve the integrity of the incoming stream. Whatever GOP size you set for the incoming stream, that size will be maintained on the streaming outputs.

 


Have a question or comment? Add to the conversation by commenting below or email me at kweinberger@llnw.com.

 

Keith Weinberger, Limelight’s Director of Product Management, Video, manages the features and roadmap for live streaming video transcoding, video on demand and online video platform products: MMD Live, MMD OD, Video Player and OVP.

Hello Limelight Connect members.

 

Q: I only have MP4 files for my video library. How can I use MMD On Demand to power my VOD service for adaptive bitrate HLS and DASH delivery? 

 

A: MMD OD (On Demand) has a powerful feature for VOD service providers who have MP4 versions of their video assets and do not want to encode them into various formats with separate manifests. Through a simple URL formation consisting of the various bitrate versions of the MP4s, you can have MMD OD dynamically create HLS, DASH, HDS and MSS manifests and ABR (Adaptive Bit Rate) streaming. This saves you the hassle of encoding your files to different bitrates and storage costs for the encodings and manifests you would have to create. Contact your Account Representative to find out more. 


Have a question or comment? Add to the conversation by commenting below or emailing me atkweinberger@llnw.com.

Keith Weinberger, Limelight’s Director of Product Management, Video, manages the features and roadmap for live streaming video transcoding, video on demand and online video platform products: MMD Live, MMD OD, Video Player and OVP.